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Chicago and Earth, Wind and Fire at Rogers Arena

Chicago and Earth, Wind and Fire at Rogers Arena, Vancouver, Nov. 7 2016. Kirk Chantraine photo.

Chicago and Earth, Wind & Fire at Rogers Arena, Vancouver, Nov. 7 2016. Kirk Chantraine photo.

Photos – Chicago and Earth, Wind and Fire at Rogers Arena, Vancouver, Nov 7 2016

– photos by Kirk Chantraine

Chicago and Earth, Wind and Fire at Rogers Arena, Vancouver, Monday night. The bands are on what they are calling the Heart and Soul Tour 3.0. The two bands have gone out together twice before. The 15-city tour started in Rochester, New York, Oct. 19, concluding Nov. 13 in Billings, Montana.

According to a review of the Edmonton show a couple of nights previous, “At last count, for the last set, there were 21 musicians on stage: six horns, three percussionists, two drummers, keyboardists, guitarists, two bass players, and about a dozen singers.”

According to the same review, the two bands “did their respective hits, and played on each other’s biggest songs: ‘September’, ’25 or 6 to 4′, ‘Shining Star’, ‘Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?'” For the tour, both bands appear onstage at the beginning. Following a brief interlude, Earth, Wind and Fire (which lost their founder, Maurice White, earlier this year) play a set, followed by another interlude. Then Chicago comes on. Then everyone joins in for the last part of the show.

Origins of Chicago and Earth, Wind and Fire

Both bands are originally from Chicago. Earth Wind and Fire came together in 1971. They went on to earn 12 American Music Awards nominations and four awards, and have been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Vocal Group Hall of Fame. The group has and sold over 100 million records, making it one of the best-selling bands of all time.

Originally known as The Big Thing and then Chicago Transit Authority, Chicago formed in 1967. Its original six members had met at university. Jimi Hendrix apparently told guitarist Terry Kath that Kath was better than him.

The band released their first record in 1969. A double album, the eponymous Chicago Transit Authority sold over one million copies by 1970. Songs include “Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?”, “Beginnings”, “Questions 67 and 68”, and “I’m a Man”, all later released as singles.

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